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Final Times poll predicts an SNP majority — and one Alba MSP

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The SNP is set for a four-seat majority as the Scottish Greens could more than double their number of MSPs, a new poll suggests.

The final study by YouGov for The Times of this election cycle of 1,144 Scots, released just hours before the last televised debate, put the SNP on 52% in the constituency and 38% on the regional list.

While the Scottish Greens will take 13% of the regional vote.

Modelling by polling expert Professor Sir John Curtice has the SNP on 68 seats, a majority of four, while the Greens will take 13 seats, more than double their current haul of five.

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READ MORE: Scottish election – Latest poll forecasts fortune for SNP

The Alba Party, led by Alex Salmond, would also pick up a seat after receiving 3% of the vote, with the seat likely to come in the Mid Scotland and Fife region – where it received 7% of the vote in the YouGov study.

But Mr Salmond would not be the one taking the seat, with Eva Comrie most likely to enter Holyrood among 81 other independence-supporting MSPs.

Eva Comrie, right, would be Alba’s only MSP

The Scottish Tories, according to the poll, are set to win 26 seats, down five from the last election, but will retain a tight hold on second place as Labour could drop to 17 seats – losing seven.

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Earlier on Tuesday, a study by Opinium put support for the SNP at 51%, down two points from a previous poll last month, while Labour and the Tories gained ground.

Douglas Ross’s Scottish Conservatives were up two points to 23%, with Labour up by one point to 19%.

On the regional ballot, SNP support dropped by three points to 41%, with the Tories up by one point to 23% and Labour remaining steady on 17%.

The polling, for Sky News, projected the SNP could win an outright majority with 67 seats, with the Conservatives forecast to hold on to second spot with 29 MSPs, ahead of 20 for Labour.

Support for the Liberal Democrats was at 7% in the constituency section of the ballot and 6% on the regional list.

Meanwhile, the Scottish Greens, who run mainly on the list section, were at 8% on this, ahead of former first minister Alex Salmond’s new Alba Party, which was on 3%.

HeraldScotland:

The Scottish Greens, led by Patrick Harvie and Lorna Slater, are forecast to do well

Fewer than three out of 10 (28%) of those questioned wanted a referendum in the next two years, with support for a second independence vote in this timescale down by five points on the previous study.

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Meanwhile, a further 14% of voters think a fresh vote on independence should happen in the next two to five years, a drop of two points.

A total of 1,015 voters were questioned for the poll, with the research taking place between April 28 and May 3.

READ MORE: SNP set for knife-edge majority but support has declined, new poll finds​

On the key issue of Scottish independence, Opinium found voters were split 50/50 – down from 51% support for Yes in last month’s poll.

SNP depute leader Keith Brown, after the earlier poll, said the result of Thursday’s election was on a “knife edge”, adding: “Anything less than both votes for the SNP risks leaving Scotland’s future in the hands of Boris Johnson and the Tories instead of the safe hands of Nicola Sturgeon.”

While Tory candidate for Glasgow Annie Wells said: “More polls show that only the Scottish Conservatives can stop an SNP majority, stop another independence referendum and get all of the focus back on rebuilding Scotland.

“Seven polls in the last week have demonstrated that voting for the biggest opposition party, the Scottish Conservatives, is the only way to stop an SNP majority.

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